Why Mnangagwa is desperate for dialogue with Chamisa’s MDC

chamisa mnangagwa edChamisa, Mnangagwa

It is a priceless guess that President Emmerson Mnangagwa had a good start, despite inheriting a bruised nation, he had enough room to prosper, the world which had been fed up with former dictator Robert Mugabe embraced him.

Even in his first speeches Mnangagwa brought hope to the hopeless, he spoke the people’s language.

He promised to be a listening President, and once described himself as a servant leader who is ‘as soft as wool.’ But later turned out a man with a ‘rock hard’ heart.

It was before long, that many noticed the creature they are embracing and playing with. In a short period of time Mnangagwa succeeded in revealing his real self.

Ever since, many are now doubting his sincerity on almost everything he says.

At the moment, he is entangled in attempts to bring a dialogue that would unlock opportunities for the country, however, the manner he is handling the matter leaves a lot to be desired, putting his sincerity at test again.

Many are now made to believe he would be negotiating in bad faith, and with a sinister motive. Some say he wants to ride on false impression to the outside world.

One such person who believes Mnangagwa only wants dialogue so as to hoodwink the outside world is Elder Mabhunu, he says where there is a political disharmony real dialogue to solve it should be based on mutualism.

“The worrying part about Mnangagwa is that he doesn’t want to reform and attract the much needed international support, but tries to get it through the back door.

“That is the reason why he badly needs the talks, without the necessary enabling environment, as claimed by other political parties,” he says.

He says Mnangagwa lost the chance to turnaround the country’s economy when he dislodged Mugabe, and now without reforms, wants to buy sympathy through a deceptive national dialogue.

However, Mabhunu says while a deceptive national dialogue may ease the situation for a little while, the long term solution is total reformation by Mnangagwa so that he can gain the people’s trust and confidence.

“As Zimbabweans, we have suffered for a long time, and to most of us any relief be it temporary or short-lived is a welcome development.

“However, a lasting solution comes from gaining trust and confidence from both locals and foreigners alike, as well as a return to rule of law and shunning human rights abuses.

“What Mnangagwa is trying to do is to blindfold the international community that everything is now in line, while on the ground dodging the much needed reforms,” adds Mabhunu.

Apparently, ZANU-PF secretary for legal affairs Paul Mangwana recently lambasted the Movement for Democratic Change-Alliance (MDC-Alliance) for not being pro-people by declining dialogue.

He described the Nelson Chamisa led MDC-Alliance as a vital part of the solution, and urged the party to come aboard the dialogue table.

Mangwana disclosed the main reason why Mnangagwa is now pushing for dialogue, it is because he wants to attract foreign direct investments.

He told a local television that dialogue was critical as it opens room and make it easier to attract foreign investors.

“If other economic players hear that in Zimbabwe the political parties are resolving whatever issues they have peacefully, this attracts foreign direct investment.

“The more we engage in dialogue, …, the more we attract foreign direct investment and the more we are able to turn around our economy,” he said.

Mangwana’s sentiments seem to be in agreement with Mabhunu’s belief as to why Mnangagwa who once vowed not to engage the opposition now needs them. He says after missing the previous chances that came his way, a series of own goals, Mnangagwa is now very certain, his only bail out now lies in a national and inclusive dialogue.

 

 

 

 

 

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